Spread the word!


Barnard Professor Sheri Berman’s contribution to Dissent’s Fall 2015 issue (“No Cheers for Anarchism”) makes it clear she holds anarchism — and anarchists — in contempt. I looked for, but sadly could not find, a well-argued reason why. Her essay is plagued by the kind of scattershot superficial analysis, innuendo, and guilt-by-association better suited to a publication like the Weekly Standard than such a storied journal of the left.

While students didn't get everything they wanted and the struggle continues, the relative swiftness of victory here is worth examining.

Last night, we learned that five trustees of the Cooper Union suddenly resigned from the board, including the board's recent chairman Mark Epstein. This is an unambiguous victory for anti-tuition organizers and activists, and a victory for the future of Cooper Union.



State of the Union 2015The annual State of the Union Address is a key aspect of the political spectacle of the modern Presidency. It's in these addresses that Presidents announce new policy goals, attempt to shore up public support, try out new narrative and rhetorical frames to shape the political landscape for the coming year, and in most cases, assiduously avoid going into detail.

Meanwhile, at the Board of Trustees...

Boards of Trustees (or Regents, Visitors, etc.) are as old as American colleges themselves. The University of Virginia's initial Board of Visitors included two Presidents —Thomas Jefferson and James Madison — and a host of local and national politicians. 

The grievances that have spurred the strike are specific to higher ed, but the general line of attack from UC administrators is one that workers experience everywhere.

UAW President Bob King

Last Friday, workers at Volkswagen's factory in Chattanooga, Tennessee voted 712 to 626 against unionizing with the United Automobile Workers. There are more than a thousand unionization votes in the U.S. every year, so what made this vote particularly important? What can students learn from their failure?

Edward L Gleaser loves him some unpaid internships, because capitalism.

Edward Glaeser, an economics professor at Harvard, lays out the case for working for free.

Well, free for your employers, not for you, because you should really just take out a few more student loans while you're at it:

Former UC Davis cop John Pike, made infamous when cameras captured him casually pepper spraying dozens of peaceful protesters, is now receiving $38,059 from the university. But it gets worse.

Yesterday, in the middle of a packed auditorium at SUNY's Binghamton University, President Obama laid out a number of proposals aimed at reforming the U.S. system of higher education. Here's why they miss the mark.